Beach Trash Transformed into Art

I’ve been fortunate to know artist Deborah Hecht for nearly 40 years.  In that time I’ve watched her expand from watercolorist to using ceramic tiles as her canvas, to carving, glazing and firing clay into three-dimensional installations and sculptures, to assemblages of found and finessed objects to her latest wonders — turning beach trash into breathtaking art.
        It began with collecting balloons and streamers on the beach of her Lake Michigan summer home. More and varied trash washed up: bubble wands, bottle caps, plastic shovels just to list a few.  Deborah collected, culled, and cataloged and ultimately created delightful, breathtaking works of art.
        At her recent art opening at the Woods Gallery in Huntington Woods, MI  Deborah recalled taking stock of the bags and bags of trash she had organized, “I’m an artist.  So I did what I do. I  made art out of it.”
        The exhibit is on throught August 31. Don’t miss it.  I can’t wait to return with our granddaughters.

“Beach Trash on Shutters”

Someone snapped this of me and said it looked like I had just stepped out of the painting. Maybe I was looking for a way back in?

 

Not a Quilting Bee, and Yet….

Monday evening I did something I haven’t done since Covid, and maybe even a few years before that. Some girlfriends and I got together to assemble welcome baskets for guests of a friend’s daughter who’s getting married this weekend. The bride asked us to be environmentally mindful — no extra tissue, no plastic water bottles, no extra wrapping. After two plus years of fraught deicsions over masks, vaccines, boosters, plane rides and socializing, choosing between granola bars and pop corn, chocolates and trail mixes was a balm.

We organized everything assembly-line style — bags, labels, water boxes, treats, ribbons, and a group gift for the bride. Before setting to work we did something so very commonplace pre-Covid: we shared some pizzas, salad and fabulous homemade almond cookies (thank you, Tim.)  It was a thrill to catch up with one another, weaving our shared excitment into an embrace for our friend. Her husband is quite ill; our joy is also threaded with strands of sorrow.

In our card to the bride, we thanked her for getting married and giving us an opportunity to celebrate her joy. Within the void of what Covid has taken away, assembling welcome baskets was burnished with even deeper joy.